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The small village of Alcantarilha in central Algarve just along the EN125 has much to offer with its bone chapel which is outside attached  the side of the main church that sits in the village centre with the one car width road which runs through the village centre point, it has a monthly Market.But once a year it comes to life with a dried fruits fair, whilst you may think that sounds boring, think again, it is held over 3 days in September normally the first week in September, with Live Music on  stage , local restaurants set up outside kitchens with seating areas,as well as beer/wine stands, on this page you will see a selection of just what the fair has to offer.

Alacantarilha Annual Dried fruits fair

Dried Carobs beans that grow on the The Algarrobo tree, they are used for many things including  making chocolate from the bean with the husk used for flour, and animal feed

The Fair sets up a  way of life living museum marque, showing how the Portuguese lived in the past

Above a typical living area Note the terracotta water carrying vessels that were use to collect water from springs or filled up by cart that would be horse drawn,and deliver to houses.

Below a typical bedroom with iron bedsteads that were very popular throughout Portugal the one in the photo is a basic one , more wealthy families would have flower decorated headboards or even coat of arms of the family

Just some of the many stands and stalls selling sweets made with figs or apricots as well as almond sweets and cakes even liqueurs are made from the many different fruits that Portugal produce, as well as food produce there are local crafts stalls selling homemade and knitted items as well as hand made lace

Information on the fair is courtesy of www.algarvefairs.com

Dried Black and Green figs

Smoke cured hams from  Monchique mountains

Sweets and cakes made from dried fruits

Just a few of the Stalls showing the homemade crafts and tradition skills still used today and used in the home

Live music played until early hours attracts locals and other surrounding villages